My Prints

Midnight on the Mountain

SOLD

This is a collagraph print on Somerset Velvet 3oog paper. The plate is in two pieces and printed in black except for the rusty red roof of the lonely farmhouse and the trees to the bottom right which shimmer gold in the moonlight. It is a unique print in this colourway.

Moonlight on the Mountain

Moonlight on the Mountain

This is the same collagraph in deep blues. The crescent moon is a semi transparent addition in silver gold

Baubles

This is a fun piece I made for Christmas in an edition of 5. It comprises three collagraph plates printed onto Somerset 300grm paper. I then used Angelina fibres to accent some areas and create a seasonal sparkle. Unfortunately this doesn’t show up on the photo. It suppose it is a bit kitsch but a member of my family had one of the prints to hang in the hallway of his old Victorian cottage style house. The window is opposite where it hangs and the Angelina baubles sparkle in the light. It looks really festive and he plans to keep it up after Christmas now. I still have three left if anyone wants to add a bit of cheer to a wall.

Dolly

This is one of my favourite pieces. It was made as part of my final exhibition show and shows an etching  that I printed onto unfired damp paper clay. I used ceramic  underglaze powder stain and plate oil to make my own  etching ink so that it could be fired. The tricky bit is getting the clay damp enough to pick up the ink from the metal etching plate without the press just squashing and rolling the clay. Too dry though and the clay just cracks. What I love is the way the clay has torn at the edges and begun to distort in some places. This was perfect as I was trying to achieve the look of a very old fragment of a photo or drawing. It was then fired to 900C and as it was so low fired it is very fragile. It is float mounted on small pads and set in a deep box frame.

Long Ago in Paris

This is a wide collagraph border surrounding a small toned cyanotype photograph. I wanted the border to echo the period of the photograph.

Los Olivos

Los Olivos

This is a woodcut burnished by hand onto Japanese paper and is one of an edition of 5. It shows  olive groves  on a Spanish hillside.

Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

Up Above the World So High

Dream Catcher

A series of three  narrative prints produced by a combination of drypoint and collagraph  techniques on foil board and printed onto Somerset Velvet 300gms paper. The plates can’t be varnished without losing the fine line work so they break up very quickly with inking. This means it’s not usually possible to get more than a couple of prints from each plate.

Edith

Edith

Edith

Lino cut portraits of my maternal grandmother. From a photograph taken early in the 20th century. She was a very beautiful young woman.

Three books of cyanotype photographs – Manchester Artists’ Book Fair 2009. There are two ‘albums’ of risque Victorian images in brown buckle fastened covers and a little ‘Brief History of the Bicycle’ which was a fun book produced for my son who is a cyclist.

Page from A Gentleman's Private Album

Sample Pages from the books

The books have now been recovered, better paper used for the pages with glassine inserts inbetween. A big improvement. Ah well it’s all a learning curve and I am sure I will look at them in a month or so and want to improve them again but this time I shall start from scratch. There is a limit to how much recovering is sensible. They are for sale at Gallery 36 at the moment but unfortunately have been put in a glass case even though I took gloves so they could be handled. I do think books have to be handled. The only time I buy a book with out at least flipping through it would be a paperback at the airport when my flight is on last call. And that’s only spending less than ten pounds not fifty. I would definitely want to take a look at that price.

I have recovered the books…..so much nicer and so much better now.

Recovered and looking good

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2 responses to “My Prints

  1. you should do some more prints like dolly. i really like these

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